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بوئین زهرا دهکده کیوکوشین (استاد یوسف شیرزاد)

world kyokushin figthers

Japan Fighters

Akiyoshi Matsui

Akiyoshi Matsui's record:
4th World Tournament 1987 – 1st 
3rd World Tournament 1984 – 3rd 
(Lost to Senpai)
18th All Japan Tournament 1986 – 1st 
17th All Japan Tournament 1985 – 1st 
15th All Japan Tournament 1983 – 8th 
14th All Japan Tournament 1982 – 3rd 
13th All Japan Tournament 1981 – 3rd
12th All Japan Tournament 1980 – 4th
100 Man Kumite - 1986

Matsui is one of the greatest technicians Kyokushin has ever produced. His timing is so extraordinary that it enables him to counter his opponents with knockout techniques such as his favourite jodan mawashi geri and ushiro mawashi geri to gain ippon. At the tender age of 17 Matsui became 4th in his first All Japan Tournament. four years later Matsui appeared in first World Tournament where he finished in third place. Matsui then won the All Japan title in 1985 and 1986 by beating Hiroki Kurosawa and Akira Masuda in the respective finals. That year Matsui also completed the 100 man kumite test and entered the 4th World Tournament as favourite. At this tournament Matsui did not disappoint as he became champion after defeating amongst others Michael Thompson in the semi final and the great Andy Hug in the final.

Makoto Nakamura

Makoto Nakamura's record:
3rd World Tournament 1984 – 1st
2nd World Tournament 1979 – 1st 
13th All Japan Tournament 1981 – 2nd 
12th All Japan Tournament 1980 – 2nd 
11th All Japan Tournament 1979 – 1st 
10th All Japan Tournament 1978 – 3rd
  9th All Japan Tournament 1977 – 3rd

 

For a fighter in excess of 125kg Nakamura was blessed with great speed, this coupled with his heavy punches, powerful kicks and ferocious fighting style made him an almost unstoppable opponent. At his peak Nakamura was the arguably the most feared fighter in the world and this day he remains the only person to have won the World Tournament on two occasions. He is still remembered for his epic battles against the likes of Keiji Senpai, Ademir Da Costa and Michael Thompson on the way to winning his two World Titles and reaching three successive All Japan finals where he also won the title on one ocassion.

 

Kenji Yamaki

Kenji Yamaki's record:
6th World Tournament 1995
(IKO-1) – 1st 
5th World Tournament 1991 – 5th
(Lost to Kurosawa)
4th World Tournament 1987 -
Last 32 (Lost to A. Da Costa)
26th All Japan Tournament 1994 – 1st
25th All Japan Tournament 1993 – 7th
24th All Japan Tournament 1992 – 7th
22nd All Japan Tournament 1990 – 8th
21st All Japan Tournament 1989 – 1st
20th All Japan Tournament 1988 – 3rd
18th All Japan Tournament 1986 – 3rd
10th All Japan Weight Tournament 1993 – 1st
100 Man Kumite - 1995

Yamaki is another of Japan's large fighters, at in excess of 100kg he still possessed superb techniques which enable him to knock out many opponents after wearing them down with his immensely powerful punches and low kicks. After finishing 3rd in the 18th All Japan, Yamaki earned his place at the World Tournament a year later. After reaching the final day he lost on boards after to Brazilian legend Ademir Da Costa. Four years later and after winning the All Japan title Yamaki reached the quarter finals of the 5th World Tournament but was defeated by Kurosawa. He would have his revenge at the 6th World Tournament in 1995 as a superbly intelligent performance saw Yamaki defeat Kurosawa at the same stage and go on to win the tournament. Yamaki duly retired from competition the reigning World and All Japan Champion.

Keiji Senpai

Keiji Senpai's record:
3rd World Tournament 1984 – 2nd 
(Lost to Nakamura)
2nd World Tournament 1979 – 2nd
(Lost to Nakamura)
15th All Japan Tournament 1983 – 7th 
14th All Japan Tournament 1982 – 1st 
13th All Japan Tournament 1981 – 1st 
12th All Japan Tournament 1980 – 1st 
11th All Japan Tournament 1979 – 2nd 
10th All Japan Tournament 1978 – 2nd
  9th All Japan Tournament 1977 – 6th 
  8th All Japan Tournament 1976 – 5th
  6th All Japan Tournament 1974 – 8th
100 Man Kumite - 1990

Keiji Senpai is the embodiment of Kyokushin fighting spirit, his never say die attitude is testimony to his amazing character. This was never more evident than the final of the 3rd World Tournament where he fought with four broken ribs for four extensions in a fight lasting 10 minutes. Senpai became the first fighter to win three All Japan titles and competed in the final five times in succession. He also remains one of only three fighters two have competed in two World Tournament finals, unfortunately both times losing after epic battles two his old foe Makato Nakamura. Six years after retiring from fighting Senpai became one of the select few to complete the 100 Man Kumite.

Hajime Kazumi
 

Hajime Kazumi's record: 
7th World Tournament 1999
(IKO-1) – 2nd (Lost to Filho)
6th World Tournament 1995
(IKO-1) – 2nd (Lost to Yamaki)
2nd World Weight Tournament 2001
(IKO 1) - 1st
34th All Japan Tournament 2002
(IKO-1) – 1st 
30th All Japan Tournament 1998
(IKO-1) – 1st 
29th All Japan Tournament 1997
(IKO-1) – 1st 
28th All Japan Tournament 1996
(IKO-1) – 1st 
26th All Japan Tournament 1994 – 2nd 
25th All Japan Tournament 1993 – 1st 
24th All Japan Tournament 1992 – 2nd 
1st World Team Cup 1998
(IKO 1) - 1st 
100 Man Kumite - 1995

Hajime Kazumi, Japan's last fortress is one of Kyokushin's most decorated fighters. At twenty years of age Kazumi overcame many top fighters to reach the final of the All Japan Tournament. Since then Kazumi has never finished outside of the top two in a tournament. His simple yet effective style of punches and devastating low kick combinations has helped him reach the final of six All Japan Tournaments in a row, winning four of these to break Keiji Senpai's record, and two World Tournament finals where he lost to Yamaki, and Filho in the later on boards. Since that final defeat to Filho, Kazumi has became a World Champion after winning the 2nd World Weight Category Tournament in Osaka in 2001 and then claimed his unprecedented fifth All Japan Title in 2002 by beating Kiyama in a close final.

Hitoshi Kiyama

Hitoshi Kiyama's record:
8th World Tournament 2003
(IKO-1) – 1st 
7th World Tournament 1999
(IKO-1) – 3rd Round
2nd World Weight Tournament 2001
(IKO-1) - 1st
1st World Weight Tournament 1997
(IKO-1) - 1st
34th All Japan Tournament 2002
(IKO-1) – 2nd
33rd All Japan Tournament 2001
(IKO-1) – 1st
32nd All Japan Tournament 2000
(IKO-1) – 1st
30th All Japan Tournament 1998
(IKO-1) – 3rd 
European Championships 2000
(IKO-1) – 1st 
1st World Team Cup 1998
(IKO-1) - 1st

Kiyama came to the world's attention when he claimed first place at the inaugural World Weight Tournament in 1997. The following year he finished 3rd in the All Japan and was part of the Japanese team that won the World Team Cup. 1999 was a disappointing year for Kiyama as he lost in the second round of the World Tournament. Since then success followed for Kiyama as he won successive All Japan Titles, and the 2nd World Weight Tournament (this time in the heavyweight section). It was at this tournament where Kiyama showed his full ability by using spectacular mawashi geri jodan, and ushiro mawashi geri jodan coupled with excellent punches and low kicks. This combination helped turn the fight around against the excellent Russian Sergey Osipov in the final where the continual pressing and aggression from Kiyama brought him the title. The following year Kiyama became one of a select few to reach three All Japan finals in succession where he was defeated by Japanese legend Kazumi in a very close match.. His undoubted zenith was at the 8th World Tournament in 2003 where he defeated Kurbanov, Teixeira, an Plekhanov to become World Champion.

Kenji Midori

Kenji Midori's record:
5th World Tournament 1991 – 1st
4th World Tournament 1987 – Last 16
(Lost to Thompson)
22nd All Japan Tournament 1990 – 2nd
17th All Japan Tournament 1985 – 5th
  7th All Japan Weight Tournament 1990 – 1st
  4th All Japan Weight Tournament 1987 – 1st
  2nd All Japan Weight Tournament 1985 – 1st
Sursee Cup 1988 – 2nd

 

Despite being one of Kyoksuhin's smallest fighters at around 70kg, Midori more than made up for this with faultless technique and ability to deliver spectacular knock out blows. He fought brilliantly in the 4th World Tournament before losing to British legend Michael Thompson. Midori entered the 5th World Tournament after claiming his third All Japan Weight title and reaching the final of the All Japan Tournament. His performances were simply electrifying, after winning many fights with ippon in the early rounds Midori fought superbly to overcome the enormous Shichinhoe, the devastating Kurosawa and then defeat All Japan Champion Masuda become World Champion.

Hiroki Kurosawa

Hiroki Kurosawa's record:
6th World Tournament 1995
(IKO-1) – 6th (Lost to Yamaki)
5th World Tournament 1991 – 3rd
(Lost to Midori) 
4th World Tournament 1987 – 6th 
(Lost to Thompson - inj.)
25th All Japan Tournament 1993 – 6th 
17th All Japan Tournament 1985 – 2nd 
16th All Japan Tournament 1984 – 1st
10th All Japan Weight Tournament 1993 – 3rd
  8th All Japan Weight Tournament 1991 – 4th
  4th All Japan Weight Tournament 1987 – 2nd

 

To to this day, Kurosawa remains synonymous with relentless attacking and devastating low kicks. There has arguably never been a fighter before or since who was so capable of simply destroying opponents. Kurosawa burst onto the scene in 1984 when he became the first ever fighter to win the All Japan at their first attempt, and followed this up a year later reaching the final where he lost Matsui. In his first World Tournament in 1987 Kurosawa  reached the last eight where he could not fight in the quarter finals due to his injuries that were obtained in an epic victory over Dutchman Peter Smit. Four years later at the fifth World Tournament, he went one step further and reached the last four before losing on weight to eventual winner Kenji Midori. In 1995 at his third and final World Tournament Kurosawa achieved what no fighter had ever before by reaching the last eight for the third time where he lost to old adversary and eventual winner Kenji Yamaki.

Akira Masuda

Akira Masuda's record:
6th World Tournament 1996
(IKO-2) – 5th (Lost to Tsukamoto)
5th World Tournament 1991 – 2nd 
(Lost to Midori)
4th World Tournament 1987 – 3rd
(Lost to Hug)
3rd World Tournament 1984 – 9th
(Lost to Onishi)
22nd All Japan Tournament 1990 – 1st
21st All Japan Tournament 1989 – 4th
18th All Japan Tournament 1986 – 2nd 
17th All Japan Tournament 1985 – 3rd
15th All Japan Tournament 1983 – 5th 
14th All Japan Tournament 1982 – 8th
100 Man Kumite - 1991

When on the tatami, despite being a near perfect technician, Masuda relies mainly on his strong punches and mawashi geri gedan, with the odd chudan or jodan thrown in for variety. Due to Masuda's exceptional ability these simple techniques prove deadly. At only 20 years of age Masuda finished in 8th place at the All Japan Tournament. In the following years Masuda was again successful in gaining podium positions at the All Japan to earn him a place at the 4th World Tournament. Masuda was exceptional in this tournament and overcame a number of tough fights before losing to the legendary Andy Hug in the semi finals. In 1990 Masuda finally achieved an ambition of his by winning the All Japan title and early the following year completed the 100 Man Kumite. These performances put him as one of the favourites at the 5th World Tournament where he was superb throughout and reached the final before losing to the excellent Kenji Midori by Tameshiwari. Four years later Masuda equaled Kurosawa's record by finishing in the last 8 of the World Tournament for the third occassion where he lost to ventual Champions Tsukamoto.

Norichika Tsukamoto

Norichika Tsukamoto's Record:
6th World Tournament 1996
(IKO-2) – 1st
8th World Tournament 2003
(IKO-2) – 7th 
7th World Tournament 1999
(IKO-2) – Last 16
1st World Cup 1997
(IKO-2) – 1st
34th All Japan Tournament 2002
(IKO-2) – 2nd
29th All Japan Tournament 1997
(IKO-2) – 1st
28th All Japan Tournament 1996
(IKO-2) – 1st 
26th All Japan Tournament 1994 – 6th
17th All Japan Weight Tournament 2000
(IKO-2) – 1st
15th All Japan Weight Tournament 1998
(IKO-2) – 1st
11th All Japan Weight Tournament 1994 – 4th

Tsukamoto is fighter whose agility and technique belies his size. For a fighter standing at over 6 feet and in excess of 90kg he possess an armoury of deadly knock out techniques.  At only 19 years of age Tsukamoto finished in the top 4 of the All Japan Weight Category Tournament and later that year finished 6th in the All Japan Tournament. Many who had witnessed him in these two tournaments saw him as a future star. Nobody could have expected his rise to be so meteoric as he became Champion in his first World Tournament, and followed this with two successive All Japan Titles and the inaugural World Cup. Following a comeback after a lengthy ban Tsukamoto placed second in the 34th All Japan Tournament in 2002. A year later Tsukamoto was in great form as he fought his way to the last eight of the 8th World Tournament where he surprisingly lost to Bulgaria's Dimitrov.

Kunihiro Suzuki

Kunihiro Suzuki's record:
8th World Tournament 2003
(IKO-2) – 1st 
7th World Tournament 1999
(IKO-2) – 5th (Lost to Okamoto)
6th World Tournament 1996
(IKO-2) – 2nd (Lost to Tsukamoto)
34th All Japan Tournament 2002
(IKO-2) – 1st
33rd All Japan Tournament 2001
(IKO-2) – 1st
32nd All Japan Tournament 2000
(IKO-2) – 1st
30th All Japan Tournament 1998
(IKO-2) – 3rd 
29th All Japan Tournament 1997
(IKO-2) – 2nd
28th All Japan Tournament 1996
(IKO-2) – 2nd
12th All Japan Weight Tournament
(IKO-2) 1995 – 1st
10th All Japan Weight Tournament 1993 – 2nd 
  9th All Japan Weight Tournament 1992 – 2nd

After successful performances in the All Japan Weight Tournament, Suzuki fought in his first World Tournament. He was excellent throughout an reached the final before losing to Tsukamoto. That defeat was a taste of things to come as Suzuki lost to Tsukamoto in the next two All Japan finals. In his second World Tournament, Suzuki was again fought superbly but was ultimately disappointed as he lost to eventual winner Okamoto in the quarter finals. Since then however Suzuki has been in outstanding form as he achieved the amazing feat of winning 3 All Japan titles in a row including victory over old rival Tsukamoto in the 2002 final. One year later Suzuki lived up to his billing as favourite as after three attempts he won the World Tournament and duly retired as champion.

Toru Okamoto

Toru Okamoto's record:
7th World Tournament 1999
(IKO-2) – 1st
6th World Tournament 1996
(IKO-2) – 7th
1st World Cup 1997
(IKO-2) – 2nd 
30th All Japan Tournament 1998
(IKO-2) – 1st
29th All Japan Tournament 1997
(IKO-2) – 7th
28th All Japan Tournament 1996
(IKO-2) – 3rd
26th All Japan Tournament 1994 – 4th
25th All Japan Tournament 1993 – 3rd
24th All Japan Tournament 1992 – 3rd
13th All Japan Weight Tournament 1996
(IKO-2) – 1st

Tsukamoto made a name for himself in the early nineties when he finished in the last 4 of the All Japan Championship 3 years in a row. The following year in his first World Tournament he claimed 7th position. After two further strong showings in the All Japan, and winning the All Japan Weight Tournament, he then finished 2nd behind his rival Tsukamoto in the inaugural World Cup. Okamoto then set about a period of dominance. Okamoto had always had extremely powerful low kicks but now appeared more relaxed as a fighter and this showed immediate benefits.  In 1998 he after many podium positions he finally won the All Japan Title and the following year he defeated all who faced him to win the World Tournament.

Yashuri Shichinohe

Yashuri Shichinohe's record:
5th World Tournament 1991 – 7th
(Lost to Midori) 
4th World Tournament 1987 – 7th
(Lost to Masuda)
25th All Japan Tournament 1993 – 4th
24th All Japan Tournament 1992 – 4th
21st All Japan Tournament 1989 – 8th
18th All Japan Tournament 1986 – 5th
 8th All Japan Weight Tournament 1991 – 2nd
 6th All Japan Weight Tournament 1989 – 1st
 4th All Japan Weight Tournament 1987 – 1st
 2nd All Japan Weight Tournament 1985 – 1st
 1st All Japan Weight Tournament 1984 – 1st

Aptly named Japan's very own Raging Bull by Michel Wedel, Shichinohe was an aggressive fighter that would storm opponents with a barrage of punches making full use of his 100kg, 6 foot plus frame; including his devastating hooks, to literally punch his opponent of the tatami. After finishing 5th an the All Japan in 1986 and having already have won 3 All Japan Weight Tournament titles Shichinohe was selected as part of the Japanese team for the 4th World Tournament where he fought brilliantly to gain seventh place after losing to Masuda in an epic battle. Four years later and having added another All Japan Weight title to his collection Shichinohe repeated his success at the 5th World Tournament by finishing 7th once more.

Yoshihiro Tamura

Yoshihiro Tamura's record:
7th World Tournament 1999
(IKO-1)Last 16 (Lost to Pichkunov)
6th World Tournament 1995
(IKO-1)Last 16 (Lost to Basile)
1st World Weight Tournament 1997
(IKO-1) - 5th
30th All Japan Tournament 1998
(IKO-1) – 2nd 
29th All Japan Tournament 1997
(IKO-1) – 4th 
28th All Japan Tournament 1996
(IKO-1) – 7th 
25th All Japan Tournament 1993 – 2nd
24th All Japan Tournament 1992 – 1st
21st All Japan Tournament 1989 – 2nd
12th All Japan Weight Tournament
(IKO-1) 1995 – 2nd
  9th All Japan Weight Tournament 1992 – 1st 
  8th All Japan Weight Tournament 1991 – 1st 
  6th All Japan Weight Tournament 1989 – 2nd
1st World Team Cup 1998 representative

In 1989, Tamura reached the final of the All Japan Weight Tournament before losing to Shichinohe. Two years later Tamura avenged this defeat in a repeat final to take the title. The following year was an enormous year for Tamura as after a below par showing at the 5th World Tournament he regained his All Japan Heavyweight title and won the All Japan Tournament. The following year in 1993, in a repeat final, he lost out to Kazumi who claimed his first All Japan title. Since then Tamura has been continuously successful in tournaments including reaching his third All Japan final and claiming 5th in the inaugural World Weight Tournament.

Ryu Narushima

Ryu Narushima's record:
7th World Tournament 1999
(IKO-1) – 8th  (Lost to Filho)
6th World Tournament 1995
(IKO-1) – Last 32 (Lost to O'Neill)
1st World Weight Tournament 1997
(IKO-1) – 3rd
16th All Japan Weight Tournament
(IKO-1) 1999 – 1st
13th All Japan Weight Tournament
(IKO-1) 1996 – 1st
12th All Japan Weight Tournament
(IKO-1) 1995 – 1st
11th All Japan Weight Tournament 1994 – 2nd
7th World Tournament Technical Award Winner
6th World Tournament Technical Award Winner

After successful performances in the the All Japan Weight Tournament, Narushima was selected for the 6th World Tournament. At this event he showed his full range of techniques, including his favourite jodan mawashi geri for which he gained an ippon in the most spectacular knock out of the tournament. After reaching the last day he met Australia's Garry O'Neill in a fight that matched arguably the two most technically gifted fighters. In an excellent match where the two fighters could not be separated, Narushima eventually lost out due to the number of boards broken. Two years later Narushima was again excellent on the World Stage as he claimed third place at the 1st World Weight Tournament. At the 7th World Tournament in arguably his best performance yet, Narushima fought his way to the last 8 before losing to eventual champion Francisco Filho of Brazil.

South America  Fighters

Francisco Filho (SHW)

Francisco Filho's record: BRAZIL
7th World Tournament 1999 - 1st 
6th World Tournament 1995 - 3rd 
(Lost to Kazumi)
5th World Tournament 1991 - Last 16
(Lost to Yamaki)
1st World Weight Tournament 1997 - 1st 
7th South American Tournament 1994 - 1st 
6th South American Tournament 1992 - 1st
5th South American Tournament 1989 - 1st 
Brazilian Open Champion - 90, 92, 93, 95
                           6th - 88, 7th - 87
Uruguayan Open Champion - 91
100 Man Kumite 1995

Non Kyokushin: 
K-1 World Grand Prix 2nd - 01, 3rd - 00, 97
                         Last 8 - 98
K-1 Yokohama Champion 2000

Ewerton Teixeira (SHW)

Ewerton Teixeira's: BRAZIL
9th World Tournament 2007 – 1st
8th World Tournament 2003 – 3rd
(Lost to Kiyama)
3rd World Weight Tournament 2005 - 1st
2nd World Weight Tournament 2001 - 8th
International Open 2002 - 2nd
(Lost to Osipov)
11th Americas Cup 2007 - 1st
10th Americas Cup 2006 - 2nd
9th Americas Cup 2004 - 1st
8th Americas Cup 2003 - 1st
7th Americas Cup 2002 - 1st
6th Americas Cup 2001 - 1st
Brazilian Open 2001 - 2nd
2nd World Team Cup 2002 - 1st

Glaube Feitosa (SHW)

Glaube Feitosa's record: BRAZIL
8th World Tournament 2003 – 3rd
(Lost to Plekhanov)
7th World Tournament 1999 - 4th 
(Lost to Kazumi)
6th World Tournament 1995 - 8th
(Lost to Kazumi)
1st World Weight Tournament 1997 - 2nd
(Lost to Filho)
Americas Cup 1999 - 1st
Americas Cup 1997 - 1st
7th South American Tournament 1994 - 2nd
6th South American Tournament 1992 - 3rd
South American Weight Tournament 1997 - 1st
Brazilian Open Champion - 96, 97, 2nd - 95 
1st World Team Cup 98 - 2nd

Sergio Da Costa (SHW)

Sergio Da Costa's record: BRAZIL
8th World Tournament 2003 – Last 16
(Lost to Osipov)
7th World Tournament 1999 – Last 16
2nd World Weight Tournament 2001 - 7th
10th Russian Openweight Champ's
2004 - Last 16 (Lost to Dedik) 
11th South American Tournament 2003 - 1st
9th South American Tournament 1998 - 2nd
South American Weight Championships 1997 – 2nd
Americas Cup 2008 - 2nd
Americas Cup 2000 - 1st
Americas Cup 1997 - 2nd
Americas Cup 2001 - 4th
Brazilian Open Champion - 02, 2nd - 00, 3rd - 97
Russian Open 2001 - 2nd
2nd World Team Cup 2002 - 1st
1st World Team Cup 1998 - 2nd

Marcos Costa (MW)  

Marcos Costa's:  BRAZIL
7th World Tournament 1999 - Last 32
1st World Weight Tournament 1997 - 3rd
1st North American Open Championships - 2nd
9th South American Tournament 1998 - 4th
7th South American Tournament 1994 - 5th
6th South American Tournament 1992 - 6th
South American Weight Championships 1997 - 2nd
Brazilian Open: 91 - 7th
                     92 - 4th
                     94 - 3rd
                     95 - 7th
                     96 - 5th 

Marcos Furlan (SHW)

Marcos Furlan's record: BRAZIL
8th World Tournament 2003 – Last 16
South American Champion 2002 -
Selection for 8th WT
South American Weight Tournament 1997 SHW - 1st
Americas Cup 1997 - 2nd
Americas Cup 1998 - 7th
Americas Cup 1999 - 8th
Americas Cup 2004 - 5th
Brazilian Grand Prix 2003 - 1st
Brazilian Open 1997- 2nd
2nd World Team Cup 2002 - 3rd
1st World Team Cup 1998 - 2nd

 

North America Fighters

Yannick Galipeau (MW)

Yannick Galipeau's record: CANADA
3rd IFK World Championships 2005 - 3rd
2nd IFK World Championships 2005 - 8th
IFK American Open Champion - 00, 02*,03*,04*
                                          2nd - 99, 01
IFK Canadian Open Champion - 00, 02, 03, 04, 05
Canadian Open Champion
(IKO 3) - 03, 04, 05
                                          2nd - 01
* = as Heavyweight

Mikhail Zimmerman (LW)

Mikhail Zimmerman’s record: CANADA
3rd IFK World Championships 2005 - 6th
(lost on boards)
2nd IFK World Championships 2002 - 5th
 (lost on weight)
1st IFK World Championships 1997 - Last 32
IFK Canadian Open Champion - 98, 99, 00, 02, 03, 04, 05
IFK American Open Champion - 00, 01, 02, 04
Canadian Open Champion
(IKO 3) - 99, 02, 04, 05
                                          3rd - 01, 03

Hugo Perez (SHW)
 

Hugo Perez's record: CANADA2nd World Weight Tournament 2001 (IKO-1) - Rd 16
2nd North American Weight Tournament 2001 - 2nd
1st Matsui Cup 2000 - 4th
Eastern Canada Open Champion - 97, 98, 00
                                     2nd - 96
IFK American Championship - 5th - 96
Americas Cup 1997 - Last 32

Tats Nakamura (LW)

Tats Nakamura's record:
7th World Tournament 1999
(IKO-1) - 3rd Round 
2nd North American Open 1998 - 3rd
Americas Cup 1997 - 5th
Canadian Open Champion - 92, 94, 98, 
                             2nd - 93
16th All Japan Weight Tournament 1999
(IKO-1) - Last 8
8th All Japan Weight Tournament 1991 -
Rd 16
7th All Japan Weight Tournament 1990 -
Rd 16
Represented North America at 1st World Cup 1998

Vittorio Russo (HW)

Vittorio Russo's Record: CANADA
7th World Tournament 2000 (IKO 3) - Rd 16
1st World Cup 2002
(IKO 3) - 4th
US Open Champion - 01
World Oyama Championship - 01 - 2nd

 

 

Diego Beltran (LW)

Diego Beltran’s Record: CANADA / ARGENTINA
7th World Tournament 2000
(IKO 3): 6th
1st World Cup 2002
(IKO 3): 2nd
South American Tournament 92: 4th 
Bolivian “La Paz” Open: 2nd*

Non Kyokushin: 
Bolivian Full Contact Nationals 1994
* : 1st
Canadian SanShou
(Kickboxing) Champion: 97, 98

* = middleweight

   Russia Fighters

Sergey Plekhanov (SHW)

Sergey Plekhanov's record:
8th World Tournament
(IKO 1) 2003 - 2nd
7th World Tournament
(IKO 1) 1999 - 3rd Rd
2nd World Weight Tournament 2001 - 3rd
9th Russian Openweight Champ's
* 2002 - 2nd
7th Russian Openweight Champ's
* 2000 - 1st
6th Russian Openweight Champ's
* 1999 - 1st
Russian Championship
(FKKR-IKO 1) 2005 - 1st
2nd World Team Cup 2002 - 2nd
* = Openweight annual Event titled Oyama Cup - IKO 1

Sergey Osipov (HW)

Sergey Osipov's record:
8th World Tournament
(IKO 1) 2003 - 7th (lost to Feitosa)
2nd World Weight Tournament (IKO 1) 2001 - 2nd
1st IFKK World Championships 2005 - 1st
International Open Champion
(IKO 1) - 2002
Americas Cup 2003 - 2nd

1st IFKK European Championships 2006 - 1st
2nd IFKK European Championships 2008 - 3rd
Russian Championships
(FKKR-IFKK) 2005 - 1st
Russian Open Champion - 2002
Russian Open Champion - 2001
Russian Open Champion - 2000
IFK European Championships 1999 - 2nd
9th Russian Championships
(FKR-IFK) 1999 - 1st
8th Russian Championships
(FKR-IFK) 1998 - 1st*
7th Russian Championships
(FKR-IFK) 1997 - 3rd*
Russian Championships
(IKO 2) 1998 - 2nd
African Open Champion (
IFKK) - 04
European Cup (IKO 1) 2000 - 1st
European Cup (IFKK) 2007 - 1st
Eurasian Open Champion (FKR-IFK) - 96*
European Open Champion - 99
*
British Open Champion - 97
*
Moscow Open Champion - 97
*
Oyama Karate World Champion – 98
*, 99*
* = as Middleweight

Lechi Kurbanov (SHW)

Lechi Kurbanov's record: 
8th World Tournament (IKO 1) 2003 - 5th
3rd World Weight Tournament
(IKO 1) 2005 – 2nd
All Japan Weight Tournament (IKO 1) 2002 - 1st
Americas Cup 2002 - 2nd
European Championships
(IKO 1) 2001* - 1st
European Championships
(IKO 1) 1999* - 3rd
European Cup 2002 - 1st
European Cup 2002 - 1st
Russian Championships
(FKKR-IKO 1) 2008 - 3rd
2nd World Team Cup 2002 - 2nd

*=as Heavyweight

 

 

Alexander Pichkunov (SHW)

Alexander Pichkunov's record: 
7th World Tournament
(IKO 1) 1999 - 3rd (Lost to Filho)
8th World Tournament
(IKO 1) 2003 - Last 16 (lost - G. Ichi)
3rd World Weight Tournament
(IKO 1) 2005 – 3rd
2nd World Weight Tournament
(IKO 1) 2001 – 4th
Russian Open Champion - 2001
Russian Open Runner Up - 2000
Russian Championships
(FKKR-IKO 1) 2001 - 1st
Russian Championships
(FKKR-IKO 1) 2004 - 2nd
9th Russian Championships
(FKR-IFK) 1999 - 3rd 
European Cup 2000 - 1st
Moscow Open - 98 - 2nd

Igor Peplov (SHW)

Igor Peplov's record:
2nd IFK World Championships 2002 - 1st
10th Russian Openweight Champ's
* (IKO 1) 2004 - 2nd
Russian Openweight Champ's
(FKR-IFK) 2003 - 1st
Russian Open Champion - 2000
12th Russian Championships
(FKR-IFK) 2002 - 1st
 9th Russian Championships
(FKR-IFK) 1999 - 4th
Russian Open Champion
(FKR-IFK) - 2004
Russian Champion
(FKKR-IKO 1) - 2000
Russian Unity Tournament 2001 - 1st
European Open Champion - 99, 01
Oyama Karate World Champion - 96, 99
South Russian Open Champion
(IKO 1) - 03* = Openweight annual Event titled Oyama Cup - IKO 1

Jakov Zobnin (SHW)

Jakov Zobnin's record: 
1st IFK World Championships 1997 - 1st
IFK European Champion - 1999
 5th Russian Championships
(FKR-IFK) 1995 - 1st
 6th Russian Championships
(FKR-IFK) 1996 - 1st
10th Russian Championships
(FKR-IFK) 2000 - 1st
11th Russian Championships
(FKR-IFK) 2001 - 3rd
12th Russian Championships
(FKR-IFK) 2002 - 3rd
1st Russian Unity Tournament 2001 - 2nd
British Open Champion - 00, 2nd - 98
IFK Spanish Open Champion - 96
IFK African Open Champion - 98
Moscow Open - 2nd - 96

Mikhail Kozlov (SHW)

Mikhail Kozlov's record:
9th World Tournament
(IKO 1) 2007 - 3rd Rd
8th World Tournament
(IKO 1) 2003 - 3rd Rd
7th World Tournament
(IKO 1) 1999 - 3rd Rd
4th World Weight Tournament
(IKO 1) 2009 – 1st
3rd World Weight Tournament
(IKO 1) 2005 – 5th
36th All Japan Tournament
(IKO 1) 2004 - 3rd
11th Russian Openweight Champ's*
(IKO 1) 2006 - 1st
10th Russian Openweight Champ's*
(IKO 1) 2004 - 1st
 8th Russian Openweight Champ's*
(IKO 1) 2001 - 2nd
 7th Russian Openweight Champ's*
(IKO 1) 2000 - 2nd
22nd All Japan Weight Tournament
(IKO 1) 2005 - 1st
1st Russian Championships
(AKR) 2005 - 1st
Russian Championships
(FKKR-IKO 1) 2008 - 1st
Russian Championships
(FKKR-IKO 1) 2007 - 1st
Russian Championships
(FKKR-IKO 1) 2006 - 1st
Russian Championships
(FKKR-IKO 1) 2005 - 2nd
Russian Championships
(FKKR-IKO 1) 2004 - 1st
Russian Championships
(FKKR-IKO 1) 2003 - 1st
Russian Championships
(FKKR-IKO 1) 2002 - 1st
Russian Championships
(FKKR-IKO 1) 2001 - 1st
Russian Championships
(FKKR-IKO 1) 1999 - 1st
Moscow Cup Champion - 02, 08
                         2nd - 00, 3rd - 99

Anzor Shikhabakhov (HW) 

Anzor Shikhabakhov's record: 
9th World Tournament
(IKO 3) 2008 - 1st
1st Unified Russian Kyokushin Championships 2007 - 1st
1st Kyokushin Rengokai World Tournament 2004 - 2nd
3rd IFK World Championships 2005 - 3rd
(lost on weight)
1st IFKK European Championships 2006 - 1st
3rd IFK European Championships 2001 - 1st
Russian Open Champion
(FKR-IFK) - 2006
Russian Openweight Champ's
(FKR-IFK) 2004 - 1st 
Russian Openweight Champ's
(FKR-IFK) 2002 - 1st
12th Russian Championships
(FKR-IFK) 2002 - 2nd
11th Russian Championships
(FKR-IFK) 2001 - 1st 
9th Russian Championships
(FKR-IFK) 1999 - 3rd*
Russian Championships
(FKKR-IFKK) 2005 - 2nd
1st Russian Unity Tournament 2001 - 3rd
IFK Spanish Open Champion - 06

* = as Middleweight

Andrey Stepin (SHW)

Andrey Stepin's record:
9th World Tournament
(IKO 1) 2007 - 5th (lost to Oganasian)
8th World Tournament
(IKO 1) 2003 - Last 32 (lost to Feitosa)
1st Unified Russian Kyokushin Championships 2007 - 4th
3rd World Weight Tournament
(IKO 1) 2005 – 4th
10th Russian Openweight Champ's*
(IKO 1) 2004 - 4th
21st All Japan Weight Tournament
(IKO 1) 2004 - 2nd
Russian Championships
(FKKR-IKO 1) 2005 - 3rd
Russian Championships
(FKKR-IKO 1) 2003 - 3rd
Russian Championships
(FKKR-IKO 1) 2002 - 2nd

Alexander Ibragimov (SHW)
 

Alexander Ibragimov's record:
1st Kyokushin Rengokai World Tournament 2004 - 3rd 
8th World Tournament
(IKO 3) 2004 - 8th (withdrew injd)
2nd IFKK World Championships 2009 - 3rd
European Championships
(IKO 3) 2005 - 1st
IFKK European Championships
(IKO 3) 2008 - 3rd
16th Russian Championships
(FKR-IFK) 2006 - 1st
Russian Openweight Championships
(IKO 3) 2003 - 1st
Russian Championships
(IKO 3) 2005 - 1st
Russian Championships
(IKO 3) 2008 - 2nd
Russian Championships
(FKR-IFKK) 2005 - 4th
Russian Open
(FKR-IFK) 2001 - 1st
Russian Open
(FKR-IFK) 2004 - 2nd
Russian Open
(FKR-IFK) 2006 - 2nd
Russian Open
(FKR-IFK) 2008 - 2nd
British Open Champion - 01
IFK Dutch Open Champion - 07
IFK Spanish Open - 3rd - 05

 

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